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Mexico FOOD Chilaquiles

Chilaquiles for Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner Posted on March 26, 2011 by Susie Albin-Najera The MEXICO Report By Susie Albin-Najera

 Ahh, chilaquiles. I could eat them for breakfast, lunch and dinner! Anyone can make them and you don’t have to be a professional chef make good ones. Believe me, if I can do it — you can too. For those unfamiliar with chilaquiles, they are a popular Mexican dish, usually served for breakfast and consist of corn tortillas cut in quarters, fried and served with red or green sauce, topped with Mexican sour cream, onions and Cotija cheese. Is your mouth watering yet? Well, many of you have been asking for my chilaquiles recipe so … here it is! We had a really neat chilaquiles experience a while back if you want to check it out. P.S. I first learned to make chilaquiles in a cooking class in Oaxaca, which I highly recommend doing. Chilaquiles recipe a la The Mexico Report 1 package of corn tortillas corn oil green salsa (you can purchase a bottle or make by hand with green tomatillos, etc.) chopped onions sour cream cotija cheese Heat skillet, pour in corn oil, break tortillas into triangular shapes (fold corn tortilla in half then in half again, and again). Triangular corn tortilla pieces Place tortilla triangles in skillet. Wait until they are crispy. Turn them over and resume frying for another minute or so. Fry the pieces in oil Pour in the green salsa into the skillet. Place all chilaquiles on plate. Slap on some sour cream, chopped onions and cover with crumbled cotija cheese. Serve crispy and hot! This photo doesn't really do it justice, but trust me, they're incredible!

Chilaquiles for Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner

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The MEXICO Report
By Susie Albin-Najera

Ahh, chilaquiles.  I could eat them for breakfast, lunch and dinner! Anyone can make them and you don’t have to be a professional chef make good ones.  Believe me, if I can do it — you can too.

For those unfamiliar with chilaquiles, they are a popular Mexican dish, usually served for breakfast and consist of corn tortillas cut in quarters, fried and served with red or green sauce, topped with Mexican sour cream, onions and Cotija cheese.

Is your mouth watering yet? Well, many of you have been asking for my chilaquiles recipe so … here it is! We had a really neat chilaquiles experience a while back if you want to check it out. P.S. I first learned to make chilaquiles in a cooking class in Oaxaca, which I highly recommend doing.

Chilaquiles recipe a la The Mexico Report

1 package of corn tortillas
corn oil
green salsa (you can purchase a bottle or make by hand with green tomatillos, etc.)
chopped onions
sour cream
cotija cheese

Heat skillet, pour in corn oil, break tortillas into triangular shapes (fold corn tortilla in half then in half again, and again).

Triangular corn tortilla pieces

Place tortilla triangles in skillet. Wait until they are crispy.  Turn them over and resume frying for another minute or so.

Fry the pieces in oil

Pour in the green salsa into the skillet.

Place all chilaquiles on plate. Slap on some sour cream, chopped onions and cover with crumbled cotija cheese.  Serve crispy and hot!

This photo doesn't really do it justice, but trust me, they're incredible!

Carpe Diem Real Estate in Puerto Vallarta, specializes in the Mexico Resort Real Estate Industry, assisting  clients with their buying and selling decisions. The Broker and Agents at Carpe Diem Real Estate, Puerto Vallarta, are members of AMPI, the Mexican National Association for Real Estate Agents, as well as being members of NAR, the National Association of Realtors in the U.S.

The Broker/Owner of Carpe Diem Real Estate Puerto Vallarta is Saul Groman. He is known for being the

“1031 Exchange Specialist”, and Robin Miller, his assistant and agent is known as the “Vallarta Beach Bum”.  Carpe Diem’s number for U.S. and Canada is (310) 683-0051, or the Mexico Office 011-521-322-222-3494.

Website: www.carpediemrealestate.com and email is info@carpediemrealestate.com

Published Sunday, March 27, 2011 11:11 AM by Saul Groman

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